3D-printed millifluidic reactionware for synthesis and analysis

Published on October 19, 2012

3D printing has the potential to transform science and technology by creating bespoke, low-cost appliances that have previously required dedicated facilities.

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We utilize 3D design and 3D-printing techniques to fabricate a number of miniaturized fluidic “reactionware” devices for chemical syntheses in just a few hours. Starting from inexpensive materials we are able to produce reliable and robust reactors. Here we show a two-inlet reactor setup with pumps and in-line or on-line analytical techniques, such as IR spectroscopy, which is used to follow an imine condensation reaction, and mass spectrometry, which is used to characterize the complexation behavior of a cyclohexane-based ligand with copper (II) chloride.

Cronin Group | University of Glasgow, UK

Professor Lee Cronin is the Gardiner Professor of Chemistry at the School of Chemistry, University of Glasgow, UK. Professor Cronin’s work spans a range of fields and he is recognized for his creative studies in the field of inorganic chemistry, specifically the self-assembly and self-organization of inorganic molecules and the engineering of complex systems leading to the emergence of system-level behaviors. Recently Professor Cronin’s group has been developing 3D printing technologies as an exciting new tool for the investigation of chemical systems.

Dr Philip Kitson is a Postdoctoral Research Assistant in the Cronin Group at the University of Glasgow. His main interests are in the development of emerging technologies such as 3D printing for use in chemical synthesis.

Dr Mali H. Rosnes is a Postdoctoral Research Assistant in the Cronin Group at the University of Glasgow, where her interests are in the development of new functional materials and the utilization and development of 3D-printed reactionware.

Dr Victor Sans is a Research Associate at the Cronin Group. His research interests are to develop advanced sustainable processing technologies to produce highly added value chemicals and materials.

Dr Jennifer S. Mathieson is a Postdoctoral Research Assistant in the Cronin Group at the University of Glasgow. Her main interests are the development and implementation of new mass-spectrometric techniques for the observation of novel species and the mechanistic studies of complex structures.

Sources

The original research article is published in the Journal Lab on a Chip.

Kitson, P. J.; Rosnes, M. H.; Sans, V.; Dragone, V.; Cronin, L., Configurable 3D-Printed millifluidic and microfluidic ‘lab on a chip’ reactionware devices, Lab Chip, 2012, 12, 3267–3271. doi:10.1039/C2LC40761B

A further research article is published in Beilstein Journal of Nanotechnology.

Mathieson, J.S.; Rosnes,M.H.; Sans, V.; Kitson, P.J.; Cronin, L., Continuous parallel ESI-MS analysis of reactions carried out in a bespoke 3D printed device, Beilstein J. Nanotechnol., 2013, 4, 285–291. doi:10.3762/bjnano.4.31

Mathieson, J.S.; Rosnes,M.H.; Sans, V.; Kitson, P.J.; Cronin, L., Continuous parallel ESI-MS analysis of reactions carried out in a bespoke 3D printed device, Beilstein J. Nanotechnol., 2013, 4, 285–291. doi:10.3762/bjnano.4.31

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