3D-printed reactionware

Published on November 16, 2012

3D printing affords the laboratory chemist unprecedented freedom to design and fabricate bespoke chemical reactors uniquely designed for specific purposes. This video demonstrates the design process of creating 3D-printed reactionware.

more...

3D printing affords the laboratory chemist unprecedented freedom to design and fabricate bespoke chemical reactors uniquely designed for specific purposes. This video demonstrates the design process of creating 3D-printed reactionware, and describes how we have used these devices to control not only the chemical environment of a reaction (the incorporation of catalysts and reagents into the structure of the reactor) but also to use the architecture of the chemical reactor itself to influence the trajectory of chemical reactions. The use of this design and fabrication process gives chemists control over their chemistry by manipulating the geometry, topology and composition of their reaction vessel for specific applications.

Cronin Group | University of Glasgow, UK

Professor Lee Cronin is the Gardiner Professor of Chemistry at the School of Chemistry, University of Glasgow, UK. Professor Cronin’s work spans a range of fields and he is recognized for his creative studies in the field of inorganic chemistry, specifically the self-assembly and self-organization of inorganic molecules and the engineering of complex systems leading to the emergence of system-level behaviors. Recently, professor Cronin’s group has been developing a number of emerging technologies for the investigation of chemical systems.
Dr Philip Kitson is a Postdoctoral Research Assistant in the Cronin Group at the University of Glasgow. His main interests are in the development of emerging technologies such as 3D printing for use in chemical synthesis. Dr Mark Symes is a Lord Kelvin Adam Smith Research Fellow at the University of Glasgow, with research interests in small molecule activation, energy storage and conversion, and 3D-printed reactionware for chemical synthesis. Dr Ross Forgan is a research fellow in Prof Cronin’s laboratory, where he combines his interests in self-assembly and functional materials with 3D printing, and has recently been awarded a Royal Society University Research Fellowship to pursue his own independent research program.

Sources

The original research article is published in the Journal Nature Chemistry.

Symes, M. D.; Kitson, P. J.; Yan, J.; Richmond, C. J.; Cooper, G. J. T.; Bowman, R. W.; Vilbrandt, T.; Cronin, L., Integrated 3D-printed reactionware for chemical synthesis and analysis, Nature Chem., 2012, 4, 349–354. doi:10.1038/nchem.1313

A further research article is published in Beilstein Journal of Organic Chemistry.

Dragone, V.; Rosnes,M.H.; Sans, V.; Kitson, P.J.; Cronin, L., 3D-printed devices for continuous-flow organic chemistry, Beilstein J. Org. Chem., 2013, 8, 951–959. doi:10.3762/bjoc.9.109

Dragone, V.; Rosnes,M.H.; Sans, V.; Kitson, P.J.; Cronin, L., 3D-printed devices for continuous-flow organic chemistry, Beilstein J. Org. Chem., 2013, 8, 951–959. doi:10.3762/bjoc.9.109

To download this video, right-click on the icon. Then, choose “Save … As…” from the menu that appears. Choose a location on your computer to download the file, and then click the “Save” button. All videos published by the Beilstein-Institut on this Web Site are licensed for use in accordance with the Creative Commons License.

Category Tag