Chemical reactions on conducting surfaces

Published on February 22, 2013

This video shows how we can achieve chemical and biochemical reactions on conducting surfaces and monitor these reactions in situ using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

Flitsch Group | University of Manchester, UK

Sabine Flitsch is Professor of Chemical Biology at the School of Chemistry at The University of Manchester, UK. Her research group is located at the Manchester Institute of Biotechnology (MIB) where the video was shot. Sabine is interested in the application of biocatalysis in organic synthesis, in particular in the synthesis of glycoconjugates and glycoarrays. These glycoarrays are prepared by a combination of solid-phase chemistry and biochemistry and are used to monitor interactions of glycans with enzymes and receptors. Martin Weissenborn and Christopher Gray are PhD students in the Flitsch group.

The work presented here is a collaboration with Dr Claire Eyers, acting director of the Michael Barber Centre of Mass Spectrometry at the MIB, and Professor Thisbe Lindhorst, Professor of Organic Chemistry at the University of Kiel, Germany.

Sources

The original research article is published in the Open Access Beilstein Journal of Organic Chemistry and is part of the Thematic Series Synthesis in the glycosciences II.

Weissenborn, M. J.; Wehner, J. W.; Gray, C. J.; Šardzík, R.; Eyers, C. E.; Lindhorst, T. K.; Flitsch, S. L., Formation of carbohydrate-functionalised polystyrene and glass slides and their analysis by MALDI-TOF MS, Beilstein J. Org. Chem. 2012, 8, 753–762. doi:10.3762/bjoc.8.86

The original research article is published in the Open Access Beilstein Journal of Organic Chemistry and is part of the Thematic Series Synthesis in the glycosciences II.

Weissenborn, M. J.; Wehner, J. W.; Gray, C. J.; Šardzík, R.; Eyers, C. E.; Lindhorst, T. K.; Flitsch, S. L., Formation of carbohydrate-functionalised polystyrene and glass slides and their analysis by MALDI-TOF MS, Beilstein J. Org. Chem. 2012, 8, 753–762. doi:10.3762/bjoc.8.86

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