nano.AR – technical applications of biomimetic nanostructures

Published on May 20, 2015

We show you a novel coating method to easily manufacture similar biomimetic large arrays of antireflective moth-eye nanostructures.

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Optical elements are an important part of many modern-day technical appliances. A major problem of all these optical elements is the reflection of light. These reflections can cause a loss in image brightness, create double images, and might even inflict damage to the equipment. Moths have solved the problem of unwanted light reflectivity millions of years ago using a dense pattern of nano-sized pillars on their eyes. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems in Stuttgart have developed nano.AR, a novel coating method to easily manufacture similar biomimetic large arrays of antireflective moth-eye nanostructures. The project is funded by the BMBF VIP program.

Dirks Group | Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems, Stuttgart, Germany

Jan-Henning Dirks is an independent research group leader of the nano.AR group at the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems in Stuttgart. In 2010 he received his PhD from the University of Cambridge (UK) for his work on insect biomechanics. After a postdoctoral fellowship in mechanical engineering at Trinity College Dublin (Ireland) and industrial research for Procter&Gamble in Frankfurt, joined the MPI in 2013. His research interest focus on fundamental principles and biomimetic applications of insect biomechanics.

Joachim P. Spatz is Director of the Dept. of New Materials and Biosystems at the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems in Stuttgart. He is also full Professor at the University of Heidelberg and head of the Dept. of Biophysical Chemistry. His main areas of research cover materials sciences, physics of soft mater, biophysics and cell biology.

Zhaolu Diao received his PhD in Photonic from EPFL Switzerland and is currently working as a postdoc researcher in the group of Dr. Dirks at the MPI in Stuttgart. His research project involves in-situ tunable anti-reflection structures on different surfaces.

Mrs. Wenwen Chen studied materials science at the university of Ulm and is currently working on her PhD thesis at the groups of Dr. Dirks and Dr. Geiger at the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems in Stuttgart. Her research focuses on antireflective properties of nanostructured surfaces and possible commercial applications.

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