Optochemical Genetics

Published on June 13, 2012

Optochemical genetics (OCG) merges small light-sensitive synthetic ligands with native or genetically engineered transmembrane proteins.

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In this video, we demonstrate the interdisciplinary nature of our research by combining the chemical synthesis of our specifically tailored molecules with their application in a biological context. As an example, electrophysiological recordings are performed in an acute brain slice preparation. In this experiment, repeated illumination of a light-switchable glutamate derivative translates into light-dependent action potential firing.

Trauner Group | Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Munich, Germany

Dirk Trauner currently resides as a Professor for Chemical Biology and Genetics at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Munich. His research interests range from organic synthesis and natural products to chemical neurobiology and optochemical genetics.

Dr. Martin Sumser is the resident neuroscientist of the Trauner Group and thus responsible for the biological and electrophysiological research.

Matthias Schönberger is a graduate student interested in the design, synthesis and testing of photoswitchable ligands.

Sources

The original research article is published in the Open Access Beilstein Journal of Organic Chemistry and is part of the Thematic Series Molecular switches and cages.

Trauner, D., Molecular switches and cages, Beilstein J. Org. Chem. 2012, 8, 870–871. doi:10.3762/bjoc.8.97

A review article about Optochemical Genetics is published in the Angewandte Chemie, International Edition.

Fehrentz, T.; Schönberger, M.; Trauner, D., Optochemical Genetics, Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 2011, 50, 12156–12182. doi:10.1002/anie.201103236

The original research article is published in the Open Access Beilstein Journal of Organic Chemistry and is part of the Thematic Series Molecular switches and cages.

Trauner, D., Molecular switches and cages, Beilstein J. Org. Chem. 2012, 8, 870–871. doi:10.3762/bjoc.8.97

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