Self-assembly of metal-complex-containing nanoparticles

Published on March 2, 2012

The self-assembly of colloids at air–water interfaces is a convenient method for the creation of high-quality, large-scale hexagonal 2D colloidal crystals. Here, we use nanoparticles containing metal complexes in two different processes for the creation of functional colloidal monolayers. After combustion of the polymer by plasma treatment, an array of metal nanoparticles is created that features the same symmetry and lattice spacing as the original colloidal monolayer.

Landfester Group | Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Mainz, Germany

Katharina Landfester studied chemistry in Darmstadt and received her doctoral degree after working with Prof. H. W. Spiess at the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research. She worked, during a postdoctoral stay, at the Lehigh University with Prof. M. El-Aasser where she gathered initial experience with the miniemulsion technique. She returned to Germany in 1998 joining the group of Prof. M. Antonietti at the Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces in Golm. There, she led the miniemulsion group working on new possibilities for the synthesis of complex nanoparticles. In 2003, she accepted a chair in macromolecular chemistry at the University of Ulm. She has been director at the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research since 2008. Her research interests are functional nanoparticles, reactions and processes in confinement, and nanoparticle–interface interactions.

Clemens K. Weiss has been a group leader in the group of Prof. Landfester at the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research in Mainz since 2008. His research interests comprise the preparation of functional nanoparticles, the self-assembly of colloids, and peptide-based nanomaterials.

Nicolas Vogel studied for his PhD in the group of Prof. Landfester at the Max Planck Insitute for Polymer Research in Mainz working on two-dimensional colloidal crystallization and colloidal lithography. Since receiving his PhD in 2011 he has been working in the group of Joanna Aizenberg at Harvard University as a postdoctoral researcher.

Sources

The original research article is published in the Open Access Beilstein Journal of Organic Chemistry and is part of the Thematic Series Chemistry in flow systems II.

Bou-Hamdan, F. R.; Lévesque, F.; O’Brien, A. G.; Seeberger, P. H., Continuous flow photolysis of aryl azides: Preparation of 3H-azepinones, Beilstein J. Org. Chem. 2011, 7, 1124–1129. doi:10.3762/bjoc.7.129

The original research article is published in the Open Access Beilstein Journal of Nanotechnology and is part of the Thematic Series Organic–inorganic nanosystems.

Vogel, N.; Ziener, U.; Manzke, A.; Plettl, A.; Ziemann, P.; Biskupek, L.; Weiss, C. K.; Landfester, K., Platinum nanoparticles from size adjusted functional colloidal particles generated by a seeded emulsion polymerization process, Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 2011, 2, 459–472. doi:10.3762/bjnano.2.50

To download this video, right-click on the icon. Then, choose “Save … As…” from the menu that appears. Choose a location on your computer to download the file, and then click the “Save” button. All videos published by the Beilstein-Institut on this Web Site are licensed for use in accordance with the Creative Commons License.

Category Tag